Category Archives: Weaving Workshops

Photos from Triangles Past…

Blue-gray Tri-Weaving in process.
Tri-Weaving in process.

Triangle weaving is fun! Period. It offers  such variety that can’t be done on a harness loom. With my love of texture, I migrated to this when I first learned and have never stopped.  It started with the state Tropical Weavers convention  years ago, where a class of weavers put together their frames, weaved for 2 days, then wondered how we were going to get these large frames home. I remember passing cars on I-10 with frames strapped to the roofs and knew they were fellow weavers on their way back.

Tri-Weaving workshop, Panama City, FL
Tri-Weaving workshop, Panama City, FL (’08)

Over the past 20 years I’ve traveled with this workshop throughout Florida plus a few other places North and had some fantastic groups.  Back in those days we made our own frames and weaved full-sized shawls on 7 ft. frames.  Over the years, I’ve whittled down the time for creating frames, because after all, weavers were impatient to get to the weaving.  The workshops started offering  two sizes: large shawls and smaller scarves, and later I offered to pre-build them.  But I miss those days when we’d haul out the power tools, prop long 1×2’s across chairs, steps, or tables, and spent some time  drilling, hammering, planning, and yaking about our planning.

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Making frames, Atlanta, GA. (’08)

Some of the more interesting settings or helpers  (you know who you are 🙂  )included a historical courtyard in St. Augustine, a wide front porch in a Victorian era house fronting the bay in Pensacola,  a cabin above Atlanta on a woodsy mountain,  the state park at White Springs Folk Arts Center, the gallery in Milton where we set up “shop” out of the back of a van,  and various yarn shops, galleries or art centers in Destin, Charleston, Baltimore,  New Smyrna Beach, and Tallahassee.

Making Tri-Weaving frames
Making frames – Destin, FL (’10)

The currently scheduled one for February 23-24th  is at Millstone Plantation,  another historical landmark sitting above Lake McBride. Millstone still raises sheep and llamas and is restoring the house and weaving studio.  Ask me any questions, but  for registration, contact: millstoneplantationtallahassee@gmail.com, or (850) 294-3918.

See more photos from the workshops on my class pages.

February 23 & 24, 2019
Saturday: 10am – 4pm  ~  Sunday: 1pm – 4pm
$ 150 includes frame kit (yours to keep) and lunch.
6500 Old Millstone Plantation Rd, Tallahassee, FL 32312
(from Hwy. 319/Thomasville Rd.)

 

Triangle Weaving at Millstone Plantation

MillstoneFlyer
MillstoneFlyer

Heads Up…  Millstone Institute for Folk Arts is hosting my next Workshop – a wonderful, historical location for this fun technique. More below.

     A little history:  Millstone is where I got started, waaay back with my 1st two lambs, Bambi and Filene. Bambi was a real “character”, butting heads, trees, and finally, me. He didn’t last too long after that. Filene became “Head Ewe” of the flock she great-great-grand-mothered through several generations.

I joined the guild, meeting every Spring Farm Days at  the “Jr. Museum” for the annual sheering and “Sheep To Shawl”  demos. Jesse Conrad brought Millstone’s ambience, knowledge, and skills to show me how it was all done. The shearer “Otis” sheared not only the Museum’s sheep, but truckloads of local farmers’ sheep that were shipped in for the event. We, the spinners and weavers, would roll out the fleeces on a long table, “skirt” the dirty tags off, and roll them up from neck to end, exposing the inner side out with rich, textured crimp of the fiber, moist with lanolin. Each spinner spun yarns, which were transferred to the loom and woven into a full length shawl. We’d all take turns, completing the process in 2 days. The 100% handspun/handwoven shawl was auctioned off at the end of the day. A great way to learn the process– I continued with other festivals’ sheep-to-shawl activities, often as contests, awarding the spinner or weaver who did the most. It was fun!

Back to Millstone. Jesse’s studio has been preserved and the original old house is being restored. Not just any old plantation on a hill, there’s a special aura with its heritage oaks, flock of sheep and alpacas, bees, garden, all overlooking beautiful Lake McBride. Millstone is developing a series of folkart workshops in wood, clay, metal, and fiber. I’m looking forward to seeing you there.

February 23 & 24, 2019
Saturday: 10am – 4pm  ~  Sunday: 1pm – 4pm
$ 150 includes frame kit (yours to keep) and lunch.
6500 Old Millstone Plantation Rd, Tallahassee, FL 32312
(from Hwy. 319/Thomasville Rd.)

For more info on joining the class, contact Millstone.
millstoneplantationtallahassee@gmail.com ~ (850) 294-3918
For questions on weaving/yarns, contact Alice.
acappa@alicecappa.com  ~ (850) 997-5505 ~  my classes page